4 edition of Distribution of the aboriginal population of Michigan found in the catalog.

Distribution of the aboriginal population of Michigan

an analysis of various artists renderings of 13 admired figures

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Published by Administrator in University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology

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        StatementUniversity of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology
        PublishersUniversity of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1968
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 128 p. :
        Number of Pages66
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2University of Michigan. Museum of Anthropology. Occasional contributions -- no. 2
        3

        nodata File Size: 3MB.


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Distribution of the aboriginal population of Michigan by University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology Download PDF EPUB FB2


There are authentic records of the buffalo having come into the forest openings of the southern counties, but it was nowhere sufficiently abundant to influence materially the permanent locations of Indian hunting groups. The pine country proper, embracing 15,000 square miles, or nearly 418 townships, was composed largely of sand hills and plains. In the west-central parts of Ohio, drained by the two rivers mentioned, the conditions for subsistence became more alluring than the expanse of country to the immediate north, and there was a corresponding numerical increase in the primitive population.

Fuller, The Michigan Historical Commission, Lansing, 1928pp. Angell, Artist, University Museums, University of Michigan. Although mammals are in general very adaptable, and although many forms range over several vegetation types, there is a considerable amount of correlation between mammalian distribution and types of vegetation. Henshaw, "Indian Origin of Maple Sugar," Am.

Distribution of the Aboriginal Population of Michigan (W. B. Hinsdale)

The stream may have been as beautiful scenically as it is to the present day tourist, but no one can maintain a home depending entirely upon scenery and sparkling water for subsistence.

The birds and their squabs were easily killed at night at their nesting places which, in some localities, covered hundreds of acres. " There were occasional patches of conifers among the hardwoods, and the latter were sometimes interspersed with pines, hemlocks, spruce, and cedars.

in Newaygo, Oceana, and Grand Traverse counties, in 1875, were shipped to outside markets 1,000 tons, or 2,000,000 pounds of young 'squabs;' while not less than 200,000 dozen, or 2,400,000 birds were entrapped and shipped to all parts of the United States and England.

Sweet flag and wild onion were used as flavors and "relishes. Distribution of the aboriginal population of Michigan might not have occurred very often that subsistence was confined for very long periods to flesh alone, but the estimates given upon the supposition that such circumstances did arise, may be instructive.

massive and tall, and centuries old; the elms, the most graceful and majestic of trees of any land; the tulip or whitewood, magnificent in size and height above even the Titans of the forest; the broad and green-leaved linden; the clean-bodied beech; the saccharine maples, so superb in their autumnal dresses. Some plants were highly prized as dyes, others for their fragrance. Veach, Research Associate, Soils, Michigan State College, to Mr.